MedDiet Can Promote Healthier Aging | Mindful Monday

A recent study published by BMJ Journals – Gut indicates that enjoying a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) can promote healthier aging.

The study was conducted over a 12 month period across a large cohort of more than 600 individuals aged 65–79 years, within 5 different European countries (UK, France, Netherlands, Italy, and Poland). The researchers evaluated the differences in the gut microbiota in each individual before and after the year of consuming a MedDiet.

The results indicate that consuming a MedDiet improved cognitive function and the gut microbiome of those in the study. 

The positive effects of these alterations showed that there was an increase in fatty acid production and a decrease in “secondary bile acids, p-cresols, ethanol, and carbon dioxide.” These changes were associated with lower frailty and improved cognitive function and an overall decrease in inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and interleukin-17.

This study shows that changing to a MedDiet can have a positive impact on people as they age.

Read more by clicking here.

Want to learn more about the Mediterranean diet? Click here.


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Warning – Common Household Chemicals Associated with Excess Weight and Osteoporosis

Experts are meeting with congress to encourage investigation of the relationship of human exposure to perfluoroakyl and polyperfluoroakyl (PFAS) on weight and osteoporosis.

Early studies have shown a link between greater PFAS exposure and increased risk for endocrine outcomes like BMI >30, but more research is needed specifically to examine factors like exposure timing,” Abby Fleisch, MD, MPH

Read More here – Endocrine Today Article

These commonly found chemical PFA substances are endocrine disrupting chemicals and may be the driving factor responsible for a variety of adverse health outcomes.

PFAS are a large and expanding group of man-made compounds that are widely used to make everyday products more resistant to stains, grease and water, according to the NIH.

PFAS can be found in nonstick cookware, stain-resistant carpeting, to-go containers, cleaning products, drinking water, microwave popcorn, and even fire extinguisher foam. Toxic Free Future advises avoiding common packaged foods with grease repellent coatings (such as pizza and french fry boxes), avoid stain resistance treatments on furniture, and check personal care products for teflon, “fluoro” or “perfluoro.”

Toxic Free Future has created a fantastic educational flyer on PFAS, it’s sources, and easy alternatives:

Full Flyer Available Here

For more tips on minimizing exposure to PFAS and what can be done about PFAS, you can visit Toxic Free Future’s website here. We also discuss PFAs in our recent FREE Webinar, Getting to the Gut. Click below to get started.


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Free Resource Friday | Getting to the Gut Webinar Ready for Viewing

Join the wonderment as we explore the role of our Microbiome

This one-hour complimentary journey will expand your view of how trillions of bacterial hitchhikers profoundly influence our health. We will discuss how foods, the environment and our medical practices have impacted our gut bacteria over time and strategies we can take to protect these old friends. You can either view the webinar for free, or to receive 1.0 CE, purchase the webinar below for just $19 (normally $29). 

Feedback from a recent participant:

“Beverly never disappoints! Great information presented so nicely. She is interesting and fun.”

“Fabulous webinar!! Great cutting edge information!”

Watch now for free (no CEs):

This webinar is completely free because we love sharing exciting information with our community! However, if you would like CEs you can purchase the individual course or as part of a series.


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

A Special Shout Out to Akkermansia Muciniphila

More intestinal mucus is better. Especially if it is microbially diverse and full of A. muciniphila. A healthy thick gut mucus lining environment boasts an abundance of A. muciniphila and is associated with decreased glucose and less inflammation. A thinner mucus layer is associated with increased diabetes risk and inflammation.

A. muciniphila, discovered only a decade ago, has the important and complex job of maintaining the mucus layer that lines the intestines. Hence the name, mucinphila or mucus loving. An intestinal mucus layer full of A. mucinphila seems to be important. This bacterium makes up just 3 to 5 percent of all gut microbes, yet it’s the main microbe floating in the mucus layer and it’s busy.

The Role of A. muciniphila

A. muciniphila prompts cells to increase mucin production which contributes to a healthy intestinal mucus layer and prevents pathogens from escaping the intestine and entering into circulation.

In rodent studies, A. muciniphila nudges the cells that line the intestine to release more endocannabinoids, which reduce inflammation and prompt release of the gut hormones, GLP-1 and GLP-2. Gut hormones lower post meal glucose levels.

A. muciniphila also helps to create small chain fatty acids from the breakdown of microbiota available carbohydrates (MACs). Fatty acids are associated with a healthier gut. They lower the intestinal pH and create a lumen environment that supports healthy bacterial diversity.

How can we increase A. muciniphila?

Metformin is associated with increased levels of A. muciniphila. Animal studies consistently show that metformin significantly promotes A. muciniphila abundance.

Eating certain whole foods and avoiding high fat diets.

Studies show that polyphenols derived from grapes and cranberries increase the abundance of Akkermansia. This results in enhanced intestinal barrier function and incretin secretion from intestinal endocrine cells. Together, these actions suppress obesity, insulin resistance, and intestinal inflammation.

In another study, apple-derived macromolecular procyanidins induced an increase in the abundance of intestinal Akkermansia leading to anti-inflammatory effects in a mouse model with metabolic syndrome.

Research has also shown that avoiding a high-fat diet and heavy alcohol intake can increase A. muciniphila abundance.

Probiotics – studies are being done to see if A. mucinphila supplements can also increase intestinal levels. There is so much more info coming out everyday about this bug superstar.


View our FREE On-Demand Webinar – Getting to the Gut, Meet Your Microbiome

This one-hour complimentary journey will expand your view of how trillions of bacterial hitchhikers profoundly influence our health. We will discuss how foods, the environment and our medical practices have impacted our gut bacteria over time and strategies we can take to protect these old friends. Join us!

Gut Bacteria Resource Page & Printable Handouts


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Your Gut Microbiome Deserves a Good Night’s Sleep

A good night’s sleep is not only beneficial for the human host, our bacterial hitchhikers also love getting extra zzzzz’s.

Studies suggest a link between gut microbiota, sleep, and cognitive flexibility in older adults; a link between insomnia and depression; between chronic sleep disruption and insulin resistance; and a positive connection between lactobacillus casei and deep sleep.

These Sleepline infographics summarize this relationship in an easy to understand and share format.

Read Sleepline’s summary of these studies here.


View our FREE On-Demand Webinar – Getting to the Gut, Meet Your Microbiome

This one-hour complimentary journey will expand your view of how trillions of bacterial hitchhikers profoundly influence our health. We will discuss how foods, the environment and our medical practices have impacted our gut bacteria over time and strategies we can take to protect these old friends. Join us!

Gut Bacteria Resource Page & Printable Handouts

Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Free Resource Friday | Getting to the Gut Webinar Nov 12th

Join Coach Beverly for an exploration into the 30 feet of lumen that affects daily well-being. This one-hour complimentary journey will expand participants view of how trillions of bacterial hitchhikers profoundly influence our health.

FREE webinar, Getting to the Gut – Meet Your Microbiome, airs Tuesday, November 12, 2019 at 11:30 a.m. Pacific Standard Time.

Beverly will discuss how foods, the environment and our medical practices impact gut bacteria over time and strategies we can take to protect these old friends.

Since we are anticipating a full-house, plan to arrive at the webinar at least 15 minutes early to hold your spot (first come, first serve basis). Don’t worry if you miss the live version, we will send you a link to the recorded version later that day.

Register below if you want to join us live, November 12 at 11:30 a.m. PST:

We offer this course as part of our Level 4 Bundle as well as an individual course! If you’re hoping for CE credit, you can purchase the individual course or the Level 4 Bundle in our store. Purchase comes with video, podcast, handouts, test, and CE Certificate.


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Diabetes Blog Bytes

Sign up now to receive the latest Blog Bytes in your inbox.

Upcoming Courses & Events

View Full Calendar