Rationale of Week | Black Spots in Eyes

For our March 30th Question of the Week, 79% of respondents chose the best answer. We wanted to “take a closer look” into this question. What is the best action to take for some one who is experiencing eye issues?

Before we start though, if you don’t want any spoilers and haven’t tried the question yet, you can answer below: Answer Question

Question: JR was recently diagnosed with type two diabetes. JR‘s A1 C was 13.9%, but now blood sugars are running in the 100 to 180 range. JR mentions that they have been noticing “black spots” floating in their eyes.

What is the best response by the diabetes specialist?

Answer Choices:

  1. This is an expected finding when blood sugars drop rapidly.
  2. On a scale of 1 to 10, how much are these spots affecting your daily quality of life?
  3. That must be really scary. Make sure to mention this at your next provider visit.
  4. Let’s get you scheduled in to see ophthalmology.

As shown above, the most common choice was option 4, the second most common answer was option 1, then option 2, and finally option 3.

Getting to the Best Answer

If you are thinking about taking the certification exam, the content of this practice test question will set you up for success. The exam will present questions that require test takers to make sure the answer matches the ADA Standards of Care and best clinical practice.

Answers & Rationale

Answer 1 is incorrect, 7.67% chose this answer, “This is an expected finding when blood sugars drop rapidly.” Actually, this is not an expected finding and warrants immediate investigation.

When people with diabetes experience fluctuations in blood sugars, they may complain of blurry vision and their glasses not working due to fluid shifts. However, a rapid drop in glucose can intensify the risk of retinal bleeds. “Black dots” or floaters can indicate retinal bleeding and warrant an immediate evaluation by an eye professional (Ophthalmologist or Optometrist). Delayed treatment can lead to serious eye problems.

Answer 2 is incorrect, 7.51% of you chose this answer, “On a scale of 1 to 10, how much are these spots affecting your daily quality of life?” This assessment question would be appropriate if the person was receiving treatment for eye problems already and we are evaluating the impact on daily life. However, this is not the case.

This sudden appearance of black dots” or floaters can indicate retinal bleeding and warrant an immediate evaluation by an eye professional (Ophthalmologist or Optometrist). Delayed treatment can lead to serious eye problems.

Answer 3 is incorrect, 5.63% of you chose this answer, “That must be really scary. Make sure to mention this at your next provider visit.” Yes, it is important to notify the provider, IMMEDIATELY. What if the next provider visit is in 6 months or a year? What if JR misses that appointment and gets lost to follow-up?

This sudden appearance of black dots” or floaters can indicate retinal bleeding and warrant an immediate evaluation by an eye professional (Ophthalmologist or Optometrist). Delayed treatment can lead to serious eye problems.

Answer 4 is correct, 79.19% of you chose this answer, “Let’s get you scheduled in to see ophthalmology.” GREAT JOB. Most of you chose this answer. This sudden appearance of black dots” or floaters can indicate retinal bleeding and warrant an immediate evaluation by an eye professional (Ophthalmologist or Optometrist). Delayed treatment can lead to serious eye problems and many people with diabetes don’t receive regular eye care. Let’s help break down barriers and make sure people with diabetes get the eye care they deserve.

We hope you appreciate this week’s rationale! Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our Question of the Week and participate in this fun learning activity!


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference | April 15-17, 2021

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice. If you are interested in taking the CDCES or BC-ADM exam or are seeking a state-of-the-art review of current diabetes care, this course is for you.

DiabetesEd Virtual Conference Flyer 2021
Diabetes Ed Virtual 3-Day Schedule 2021

Entire Program Fee: $399
Dates: April 15-17, 2021
3 Expert Speakers
CEs:
30+ CE hours
Live Webinar Schedule: All webinars start and end times are in Pacific Standard Time


Come join our Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Program.

Team of expert faculty includes:

  • Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES – Educator of the Year, 2020
  • Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM
  • Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES, Diabetes Program Coordinator

In addition to informative lectures, we also use group activities and case studies to highlight the essential knowledge, skills, and strategies needed to succeed in diabetes education today! 

Prepare for CDCES or BC-ADM certification or earn hours for renewal.

Your registrations include access to all the Online Sessions plus Bonus Courses through December 31st, 2021.

This virtual program includes:

3 day live webinar courses from April 15th-17th (20 CEs) + enrollment in our Bonus Bundle (14.0+ CEs) from now through December 2021.

  • Live Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar
  • Presentations by our team of experts
  • Handouts and Resources for each session
  • Post-test questions
  • A sense of community
  • If you can’t attend the live webinars, a recorded version will be posted later the same day for viewing.

View full Conference Schedule and Faculty.


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