Get Ready – How to Prepare for Natural Disasters

As we enter fire and storm season, it’s always a good idea to think ahead and be prepared for disaster. For people living with diabetes, a “diabetes kit” is an important part of emergency preparedness. We are excited to share a few getting ready checklists and resources that we think are really helpful.

For any emergency scenario, it’s important to have an emergency preparedness plan that includes a meeting point, an exit route, a “get-away” bag, and communication strategies. Identify and inform the people who will be included in the emergency plan ahead of time and make sure everyone clearly knows what to do and what action to take.

An easy way to get started is to download the Checklist and Plan created by the Diabetes Disaster Response Coalition. We have also created a Disaster Checklist Word document that you can download and customize for yourselves. These checklists can help you start the conversation and commit the details to paper.

Disaster can happen in a moments notice. It’s important to plan ahead and be ready, especially for people living with diabetes.

Here are a few helpful resources for ourselves and our community:

Resources for People with Diabetes

General information from the Diabetes Disaster Response Coalition (DDRC) on preparedness for people living with diabetes.

Have an Emergency Diabetes Plan and Kit Ready: DDRC’s Diabetes Plan and Kit checklist includes helpful steps to take in preparation for disaster. The checklist details needed supplies and information that should be written down and kept in a waterproof container for emergency situations where is can be found by a health care provider to make informed emergency treatment decisions.

Stay Updated: Visit JDRF Disaster Relief Resources and Diabetes Disaster Response Coalition includes information on how to access medical support, shelters, and open pharmacies during times of disaster.

Individuals with diabetes who need help: Call 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383). The American Diabetes Association Center For Information is open, MON.-FRI. 9 a.m. TO 7 p.m. ET. Representatives are regularly updated with information on how to access medical support, shelters, pharmacies, and more.

American Red Cross Shelters: Contact the American Red Cross directly at 1-800-RED-CROSS.

Resource For Health Care Providers:

  • Insulin Supply Hotline: During a disaster, call the emergency diabetes supply hotline 314-INSULIN (314-467-8546) if you know of diabetes supply shortages in your community (i.e. shelter, community center). The hotline is for health care providers only.
  • Diabetes Disaster Response Coalition (DRRC). If a disaster hits, people with diabetes may need emergency supplies and help fast. Please visit the DRRC website if you are a diabetes health care provider and are requesting information about diabetes supplies during disasters.

In addition to the items listed below, make sure to pack hand sanitizer, wipes, and masks due to the current pandemic. Also, bring your own pillow and bedding in case you need to spend time in a shelter.

Download, Share, and Personalize this Emergency Checklist

Emergency Evacuation-Items to Gather for People with Diabetes
We thought this list was a helpful way to prioritize what items to grab given different time frame limitations. We found it online and customized it for people with diabetes. It is available in Word or PDF. Thank you for sharing with your colleagues and community.

1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383) is an excellent referral resource for people with diabetes to call toll-free for updates on accessing medical support during an emergency.


10 Ways to Help the Planet

Change isn’t easy. We aren’t going for perfect, we are starting with intention and slowly moving to action, giving ourselves lots of grace along the way. I am excited to share my successes and wrong turns with you on this journey and we would love to hear from you too!

  1. Grow plants native to your area.
  2. Compost kitchen scraps and cut down on waste
  3. Eat more sustainable veggies, fruits, grains and less meat, processed foods.
  4. Drive less and walk more, especially in nature
  5. Think of 3 ways to use less water
  6. Use cold water to wash, hang clothes to dry.
  7. Turn appliances, lights and computers off when not in use.
  8. Purchase used items and re-use everything you can. Swap and trade instead of buying new.
  9. Try to use less plastics
  10. Trade out filament light bulbs for new LED bulbs.

Read more on our blog, Earth Day Secrets to Improving Planet Health

Stay tuned and we share details and resources on each of these 10 Steps over the next few months. And, please send us your stories too at info@diabetesed.net. We want to hear from you!

How to Protect the Planet Resources Page


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The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

What is the Link Between Diabetes and a Changing Climate?

Staff evacuates hospital as fire pushes closer

Like many of you, I have a personal relationship with climate change.

On a blustery day in November 2018, the Camp Fire burned down the hospital and the entire town where I provided diabetes care for over 20 years. In a matter of a short six hours, over 30,000 people who lived in Paradise lost their community and sense of place.

I lost working with my incredible diabetes team and my extended diabetes family. Others lost everything. The Camp Fire has devastated us all in very personal ways. It is considered the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history.

Since the town of Paradise was a popular retirement destination, many of those who survived the fiery drive down the hill were frail and elderly. More than 3,000 of them had diabetes and many fled their homes without their meters, insulin, or other critical medications.

With the help of the Red Cross and hundreds of volunteers, we were able to connect most people with needed medications and supplies, but many went without. People with diabetes lost connections to their providers, pharmacies and support systems.

We lost 85 of our beautiful community members due to the fire and thousands of our neighbors dispersed to other states and towns to start their lives over. Over half of our providers moved away and a hospital that provided care to a rural community was suddenly gone. This extreme loss and upheaval reveals the painful truth that we need proactively take action to reduce the frequency and severity of climate disasters and be prepared for future events.

How is climate change impacting diabetes risk?

According to a 2020 article published in the Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives, climate change, and in particular, increasing global temperatures, is expected to impact the health of people living with diabetes and lead to worse outcomes.

After completing a literature review, the authors concluded that diabetes and climate change are interconnected. Let’s explore how.

Hotter Temperatures Worsen Diabetes Outcomes

People with diabetes are at greater risk of experiencing dehydration and cardiovascular events during periods of extreme heat. With the increasing frequency of extreme heat episodes, there is an associated increased risk of heat-related death and cardiovascular events for people living with diabetes. Several studies reveal that people with diabetes have a higher risk of death on hot days, and are more likely to need emergency care and those with a history of heart disease are most vulnerable.

Shortage of Medical Supplies and Medications

Recent climate disasters, like the Camp Fire, Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and Hurricane Harvey in 2017, resulted in people not being able to access, afford or safely store their medications, including insulin. In addition, we are experiencing supply chain disruptions in D50 (25 grams of glucose in a 50 ml prefilled syringe (50% glucose)) to treat hypoglycemia and certain intravenous fluids are in short supply.

Food Supply Shortages

Extreme weather can result in agricultural production disruptions. In our community, many fields that were once green with trees and crops, now are brown and barren. There is not enough water to keep crops alive and growing. This also means job loss and less money flowing into communities. When the healthy food supply is limited, people living with diabetes may turn to lower-cost, processed foods which are environmentally unfriendly and low in nutrients.

Diabetes and climate change are clearly interconnected. Extreme weather events and rising temperatures will significantly impact people living with diabetes, especially those with cardiovascular disease. The disruption in the supply of life-saving medications (e.g. insulin) due to extreme weather combined with decreased access to healthy foods are difficult issues that require problem-solving by individuals, communities, and government leaders.

We are expecting more intense weather-related events in the future and the question is what can WE do?

As Diabetes Specialists, I believe we can make a difference by leaning into our unique blend of behavior change skills, advocacy, and scientific knowledge

We can take a two-fold approach:

  1. Take action to help slow and reverse climate change – Read our blog on actions we can start taking today.
  2. Help people with diabetes to be prepared for natural disasters. Read our blog on How to Get Ready

A note of hope. Three years after the Camp Fire, people are rebuilding in Paradise. There is a better understanding of the need for preventive forest management and exit routes. However, the longstanding California drought continues to contribute to future fire risk. Water conservation is more important now than ever. We can take action to reverse the heating planet. Read our blog on actions we can start taking today.


10 Ways to Help the Planet

Change isn’t easy. We aren’t going for perfect, we are starting with intention and slowly moving to action, giving ourselves lots of grace along the way. I am excited to share my successes and wrong turns with you on this journey and we would love to hear from you too!

  1. Grow plants native to your area.
  2. Compost kitchen scraps and cut down on waste
  3. Eat more sustainable veggies, fruits, grains and less meat, processed foods.
  4. Drive less and walk more, especially in nature
  5. Think of 3 ways to use less water
  6. Use cold water to wash, hang clothes to dry.
  7. Turn appliances, lights and computers off when not in use.
  8. Purchase used items and re-use everything you can. Swap and trade instead of buying new.
  9. Try to use less plastics
  10. Trade out filament light bulbs for new LED bulbs.

Read more on our blog, Earth Day Secrets to Improving Planet Health

Stay tuned and we share details and resources on each of these 10 Steps over the next few months. And, please send us your stories too at info@diabetesed.net. We want to hear from you!

How to Protect the Planet Resources Page


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The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

May eNews | Is there a Strong link between Diabetes and Earth Health?

Happy May

We loved celebrating Earth Day with all of you. Your response to our “PocketCard for a Planet Pledge campaign” knocked our socks off. Over 900 people committed to taking action for the Earth. Plus, hundreds of you added our own ideas. We decided to continue the planetary PocketCard party for one more week because we love our community!

This month’s newsletter explores the link between climate change and diabetes from a personal and community level. We provide ideas for prevention, preparation, and actions to take in case of a climate-related disaster. People with diabetes are especially vulnerable during extreme climate events and helping ready them for disasters can save lives.

In addition, we highlight a recent study that demonstrates reducing four risk factors improves outcomes, which is great news to share.

Living with diabetes can be overwhelming. Messages of hope for people with diabetes can provide motivation to continue with self-care during those hard times.

Lastly, I would like to dedicate this newsletter to a very special person. Ruth always showed up to our diabetes support group with the energy of two people and the mental clarity of someone half her age. Around this time of year, she would distribute Emergency Preparedness materials and would carefully review the exit routes out of Paradise in case of fire. She would go around the room and ask each person if they had their emergency bag ready. For each of the seventeen years that I ran that support group before the hospital and town burned down, Ruth gave the same impassioned spiel. I can only imagine how many lives she saved.

May we all embody the spirit of Ruth as we move forward on this journey. With wishes for health and wonderment,

Beverly, Bryanna, Jackson, and Amanda


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Studying for the CDCES Exam?

Enroll in CDCES Online Prep Bundle + 5th Ed ADCES Review Guide Book | 47 CEs

This bundle includes our CDCES Online Prep Bundle plus the ADCES Review Guide.

The online bundle includes Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 (Boot Camp), plus two bonus courses. The ADCES Review Guide offers over 480+ practice questions and is a fantastic independent study tool and comprehensive resource for the Diabetes Care and Education Specialist Exam.


What is a Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist?

Read More: What is a CDCES?

First awarded in 1986, as Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) credential and in 2020 with a new name: Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist (CDCES) to more accurately reflect the specialty. CDCES has become a standard of excellence for the delivery of quality diabetes education. Those who hold this certification are known to possess comprehensive knowledge of and experience in diabetes prevention, management, and prediabetes.

Becoming a Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist (CDCES) is one of the best professional and personal decisions I have ever made.” – Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM


Why become a CDCES?
Three Reasons from Coach Beverly

Read More: 3 Reasons to Become a CDCES

The best part of becoming a CDCES is working with my colleagues and people living with diabetes. As diabetes educators, we hear compelling and beautiful life stories. I am astounded by the barriers they face and inspired by their adaptability, problem-solving skills, and resilience.

– Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM

Reason 1: CDCES is a widely recognized certification by employers and health care professionals throughout the U.S.  This credential demonstrates a specialized and in-depth knowledge in the prevention and treatment of individuals living with pre-diabetes and diabetes.

Reason 2: Currently, 10% of people in the U.S. have diabetes and another 35% have pre-diabetes which means 45% of Americans are running around with elevated blood glucose levels.  Given this epidemic, there will be plenty of future job opportunities.

Reason 3: Having my CDCES along with my nursing degree, has opened many doors of opportunity; from working as an inpatient Diabetes Nurse Specialist in a hospital to working as a Manager of Diabetes Education in the outpatient setting to starting my own consulting company.


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The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

Risk of Diabetes Increases 40% after COVID-19 Infection

Research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology this month confirmed the same findings as a growing number of studies.  COVID-19 increases a person’s risk of diabetes, even months after being infected.

In this latest robust study, researchers reviewed the medical records of over 180,000 US Veterans who survived the first 30 days of COVID-19 infection between March 2020 and September 2021 and compared them with 2 large control groups—a contemporary cohort of more than 4.1 million non-infected participants who used VA services during the same time period and a historical cohort of another 4.28 million non-infected participants who used VA services during 2017.

What researchers discovered is very concerning

Over 40% of study participants infected with COVID-19 were more likely to develop diabetes or be prescribed diabetes medication within a year compared to the control group.  Simply translated, 2 in 100 COVID-19 patients were more likely to develop diabetes than those who did not get infected.

People older than 65 years and those with cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or prediabetes had a higher risk of diabetes than younger individuals or those without underlying conditions. Additionally, Black participants had higher risks of developing diabetes than White participants.

Most of the post-COVID diabetes cases (over 99%) developed type 2 diabetes. In addition, the severity of the COVID-19 infection impacted the risk. People with COVID-19 admitted to intensive had the highest risk of developing develop diabetes, compared to those not infected.

Some limitations of the study include that the findings may not translate to other populations, since the US Veterans study group consisted of mostly older white men, many of whom had risk factors for diabetes, including hypertension and extra weight.  The risk of getting diabetes post-COVID-19 seems to be much lower in younger people. Another limitation is that some people in the control group might have had an asymptomatic missed COVID-19 diagnosis.

Implications for Diabetes Specialists

These startling findings have significant implications for the 80 million people in the U.S. known to be infected with COVID-19, especially for people living with long-haul covid.

People who have experienced a COVID-19 infection need to know the symptoms of hyperglycemia and be encouraged to report suspicions of diabetes symptoms to their providers right away.  In addition, regular glucose testing of people who were infected with COVID-19 may now be recommended to detect those who may not be aware of the signs of diabetes.

Now, more than ever, we need to increase access to Diabetes Prevention Programs and Diabetes Self-Management Education, to make sure this expanding population of people with new diabetes gets the information they need to successfully manage glucose levels and maintain optimal quality of life.

For more information:
Washington Post Article and The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology


Want to learn more about this topic? Join us for our

Setting up a Successful DSME Program Standards | Level 2 $29 | 1.5 CEs

Recorded & Ready to Watch!

This course provides you with a succinct overview of the latest standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Support Programs. If you are taking certification exams or considering setting up a DSME program, this program is designed for you. We highlight the newly revised and simplified 2022 Standards and provide strategies on program implementation. In addition, we discuss Medicare Reimbursement and covered benefits. This course provides insights into the exam philosophy and also highlights critical content areas.

Objectives:

  1. Describe DSME program examples from across the country.
  2. List the six standards for creating a successful DSME program
  3. Discuss marketing strategies for success
  4. Describe Medicare Reimbursement for diabetes care and education

Join us for our Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference
30+ CEs

Recorded & Ready to Watch!

Virtual Conference Banner with Speakers ready

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

If you are seeking a state-of-the-art review of current diabetes care, this course is for you. Our team has been fine-tuning this course for over fifteen years, and we know what you need. This program can also be a great addition to your CDCES or BC-ADM exam study plan.

 Download Course Schedule |  Download Course Flyer

Join us LIVE for this Virtual Course and enjoy a sense of community!

Team of expert faculty includes:

  • Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES – Educator of the Year, 2020
  • Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM
  • Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES, Diabetes Program Coordinator

 Download Course Schedule |  Download Course Flyer


Two Registration Options


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Deluxe | 30+ CEs

Deluxe Option for $499: Virtual Program includes:

  • Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar.
  • LIVE Presentations by our team of experts.
  • State of the art review of current diabetes care and technology.
  • Resources for each session.
  • Access to free podcasts and video recordings within a week of each live session for one year.

Deluxe Version includes Syllabus, Standards and Swag*:

  • Diabetes Educator Course 2022 Syllabus Hard Copy – over 100 pages -This spiral-bound workbook contains the printed version of all of the instructor’s slides.
  • ADA 2022 Standards of Care Book -The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes is a key resource for healthcare professionals involved in diabetes care, education, and support.
  • DiabetesEd Services highlighters, Medication PocketCard, Tote Bag and Pen

Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Basic | 30+ CEs

Deluxe Option for $499: Virtual Program includes:

  • Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar.
  • LIVE Presentations by our team of experts.
  • State of the art review of current diabetes care and technology.
  • Resources for each session.
  • Access to free podcasts and video recordings within a week of each live session for one year.

Don’t worry if you can’t make it live. Your registration guarantees access to the recorded version in the Online University.


All hours earned count toward your CDCES Accreditation Information


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

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The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

April eNews | New Diabetes Self-Management Standards – 9 Takeaways

Happy April

If you want to get fired up about providing Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES), I highly recommend reading the updated Standards for DSMES. If you don’t have time to read the complete document, we have provided our top 9 takeaways to get you started.

This new version of the DSMES Standards, authored by a collaboration of education specialists, offers a fresh outlook and a simplified six standards with the clear goal of increasing inclusivity and breaking down barriers.

In addition, we explore the expanding clinical applications of the SGLT-2 Inhibitor class.

Clearly, the newer diabetes medications are impacting more than glucose levels, they can also boast about co-benefits including cardiovascular and renal protection. We have updated our Med Pocket Cards to reflect this new perspective and considerations.

Our last two articles take a look at the concerning findings of increased risk of future diabetes post-COVID-19 infection. Large, controlled trials are saying the same thing, about 25-40% of people one year after experiencing COVID-19 are being diagnosed with new type 2 diabetes.

Lastly, to celebrate EARTH DAY, we pause, take a deep breath and notice the wonderment and gift of our beautiful planet. Research shows that planet health improves human health and decreases chronic diseases. Maybe we can each start with one action toward caring for our planet. We provide some great getting started resources on growing native plants in your backyard, patio, or veranda. All of our actions matter.

Beverly, Bryanna, Jackson, and Amanda

Featured Articles

Upcoming Webinars

Featured Items


Want to learn more about this question?  Join us for our

Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference
30+ CEs | April 13-15, 2022

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

 Download Course Schedule |  Download Course Flyer

If you are seeking a state-of-the-art review of current diabetes care, this course is for you. Our team has been fine-tuning this course for over fifteen years, and we know what you need. This program can also be a great addition to your CDCES or BC-ADM exam study plan.

Join us LIVE for this Virtual Course and enjoy a sense of community!

Team of expert faculty includes:

  • Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES – Educator of the Year, 2020
  • Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM
  • Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES, Diabetes Program Coordinator

Two Registration Options


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Deluxe | 30+ CEs

Deluxe Option for $499: Virtual Program includes:

  • Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar.
  • LIVE Presentations by our team of experts.
  • State of the art review of current diabetes care and technology.
  • Resources for each session.
  • Access to free podcasts and video recordings within a week of each live session for one year.

Deluxe Version includes Syllabus, Standards and Swag*:

  • Diabetes Educator Course 2022 Syllabus Hard Copy – over 100 pages -This spiral-bound workbook contains the printed version of all of the instructor’s slides.
  • ADA 2022 Standards of Care Book -The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes is a key resource for healthcare professionals involved in diabetes care, education, and support.
  • DiabetesEd Services highlighters, Medication PocketCard, Tote Bag and Pen

Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Basic | 30+ CEs

Deluxe Option for $499: Virtual Program includes:

  • Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar.
  • LIVE Presentations by our team of experts.
  • State of the art review of current diabetes care and technology.
  • Resources for each session.
  • Access to free podcasts and video recordings within a week of each live session for one year.

Don’t worry if you can’t make it live. Your registration guarantees access to the recorded version in the Online University.

All hours earned count toward your CDCES Accreditation Information


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Sign up for DiabetesEd Blog Bytes

* indicates required


The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

What Changed with the New DSMES Standard? Nine Takeaways

If you want to get fired up about providing Diabetes Self Management and Education Support (DSMES), the newly updated Standards for DSMES is highly recommended reading. If you don’t have time to read the complete document, we have provided our top 9 takeaways to get you started.

Every 5 years, a committee of diabetes education specialists and advocates gets together to update this roadmap for the provision of DSMES. In the last version of this document, there were ten standards and lots of complicated rules and regulations required to set up a recognized DSMES Program.

In this new version, the collaborative of authors possesses a fresh outlook and clear vision that resulted in six simplified standards with the goal of inclusivity and breaking down barriers.

To address inequities, a candid discussion of racial disparities and social determinants of health is included. In addition, there is recognition that participation in DSMES has lost momentum during the pandemic with stagnant or decreasing enrollment. We need to innovate and make access and participation a top priority to make sure all people have the opportunity to benefit from this knowledge and life-saving information.

Coach Beverly’s 9 Takeaways from updated DSMES Standard.

  1. I love the definition they included of a CDCES – “A compassionate teacher and expert who, as an integral member of the care team, provides collaborative, comprehensive, and person-centered care and education for people with diabetes”. This is the best description of our caring expertise and role in improving care.

2. DSMES makes a difference! – Lowers A1c by at least 0.6% with greater A1c reductions when engaging in DSMES of 10 hours or more.  In addition, DSMES has a positive effect on clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral aspects while improving quality of life and coping skills.  Individuals who participate are more likely to engage in self-care through behavior change, including eating healthier eating and regular exercise.

3. Breaking down barriers through recognition of Social Determinants of Health and addressing equity. The authors recognize the need for person-centered services that embrace cultural differences, social determinants of health, and ever-increasing technological engagement platforms and systems. The goal is to increase health equity through access to this critical service while focusing more on person-centered care and decreasing administrative complexities.

4. Recognition of the need for a thoughtful community needs assessment that looks at more than demographics. We still need to gain data from local and national resources to identify race, ethnicity, cultural background, sex, age, geographic location, tech access, and literacy. But just as important are the perceptions of risk associated with diabetes and barriers including socioeconomics, cultural factors, misaligned schedules, and health insurance shortfalls.

5. An important and often underappreciated barrier to DSMES includes perceived lack of need and limited encouragement from health care professionals to engage in DSMES. Plus, special attention needs to be payed to those who do not usually attend clinic appointments to discover their perceived and real barriers.

6. Diabetes Care Community Coordinators are needed to help build bridges between the medical community and the community we serve. These individuals include community health workers and health promoters who live in the community and have familiarity and understanding of the needs and cultural factors of the individuals we are seeking to serve. Diabetes care coordinators also include; dietetic technicians, medical assistants, peer educators, and leaders. They can instruct, reinforce self-management skills, support behavior change, facilitate group discussion and provide social support.

7. Keep the curriculum dynamic and practical. Research endorses the inclusion of practical, problem-solving approaches, collaborative care, consideration of psychosocial issues, and support of behavior change strategies to sustain self-management efforts. In addition, supplementing with resources and support materials can help individuals navigate the health care system and promote self-advocacy.

8. Strategies to increase DSMES participation through provider referrals. Keeping programs vibrant and active is no easy task and requires constant attention. I put together a list of strategies I have used to boost referrals by providers. Direct mail of DSMES flyers to providers, networking during community gatherings, lunch and learn CE activities, hallway conversations, welcome packet for new providers, delivery of referral forms and holiday gifts to offices, and shared participant testimonials.

9. Strategies to increase DSMES participation through self-referrals. We can directly appeal to our community members and then reach out to their providers to approve the referral f. Ideas to touch your community include; publishing articles on hot diabetes topics, sending out press releases, advertising in local papers and on social media, hosting events during National Diabetes Month, joining health fairs, providing community presentations to service organizations, and promoting word of mouth marketing with your graduates.

Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support is a critical components of comprehensive diabetes care. By addressing barriers and including community members in our outreach, we can break down the walls and increase participation and improve the quality of life for all people.


Want to learn more about this topic? Enroll in our

Setting up a Successful DSME Program Standards Webinar | Level 2 $29 | 1.5 CEs

Recorded & Ready to Watch!

This course provides you with a succinct overview of the latest standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Support Programs. If you are taking certification exams or considering setting up a DSME program, this program is designed for you. We highlight the newly revised and simplified 2022 Standards and provide strategies on program implementation. In addition, we discuss Medicare Reimbursement and covered benefits. This course provides insights into the exam philosophy and also highlights critical content areas.

Objectives:

  1. Describe DSME program examples from across the country.
  2. List the six standards for creating a successful DSME program
  3. Discuss marketing strategies for success
  4. Describe Medicare Reimbursement for diabetes care and education

Join us for our Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference
30+ CEs | April 13-15, 2022

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

If you are seeking a state-of-the-art review of current diabetes care, this course is for you. Our team has been fine-tuning this course for over fifteen years, and we know what you need. This program can also be a great addition to your CDCES or BC-ADM exam study plan.

 Download Course Schedule |  Download Course Flyer

Join us LIVE for this Virtual Course and enjoy a sense of community!

Team of expert faculty includes:

  • Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES – Educator of the Year, 2020
  • Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM
  • Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES, Diabetes Program Coordinator

 Download Course Schedule |  Download Course Flyer


Two Registration Options


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Deluxe | 30+ CEs

Deluxe Option for $499: Virtual Program includes:

  • Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar.
  • LIVE Presentations by our team of experts.
  • State of the art review of current diabetes care and technology.
  • Resources for each session.
  • Access to free podcasts and video recordings within a week of each live session for one year.

Deluxe Version includes Syllabus, Standards and Swag*:

  • Diabetes Educator Course 2022 Syllabus Hard Copy – over 100 pages -This spiral-bound workbook contains the printed version of all of the instructor’s slides.
  • ADA 2022 Standards of Care Book -The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes is a key resource for healthcare professionals involved in diabetes care, education, and support.
  • DiabetesEd Services highlighters, Medication PocketCard, Tote Bag and Pen

Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Basic | 30+ CEs

Deluxe Option for $499: Virtual Program includes:

  • Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar.
  • LIVE Presentations by our team of experts.
  • State of the art review of current diabetes care and technology.
  • Resources for each session.
  • Access to free podcasts and video recordings within a week of each live session for one year.

Don’t worry if you can’t make it live. Your registration guarantees access to the recorded version in the Online University.


All hours earned count toward your CDCES Accreditation Information


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

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The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

Reducing 4 Risk Factors in Diabetes can Add Years to One’s Life

Having diabetes is a lot of work. We ask participants with diabetes to change their eating habits, drink water, move more, take a bunch of medications and attend diabetes classes plus see providers on a regular basis. In addition, we collaborate with and encourage them to get their ABC’s (A1C, Blood pressure, Cholesterol) to target.

Is worth all the work?

The short answer is YES. Making these hard fought behavior changes can add years to one’s life.

A recent study published in the JAMA Network last month suggests that people living with Type 2 Diabetes can increase life expectancy by reducing 4 risk factors and hitting specific metabolic targets.

This study evaluated life expectancy increases among 421 people living with type 2 diabetes for those who reduced A1C, systolic blood pressure (SBP), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and body mass index (BMI) with each biometer goal was broken into quartiles.

A message of hope

Providers can shine a light on these findings to encourage people with diabetes to make those difficult behavior changes, and to keep working at it when the going gets tough. Their efforts do make a difference in improving life expectancy and daily quality of life.

Reducing A1C

Participants who reduced their A1C saw the highest increase in life expectancy compared to the other biometers. For those with the highest A1Cs, lowering their levels added years to their life expectancy.

  • Fourth Quartile – The individuals who were able to bring their A1C’s down to 5.9% that started in the highest quartile at an average of 9.9% saw an average of 3.8 years added to their life expectancy.
  • Third Quartile – Those who brought it down to 7.7% from 9.9% in the third quartile saw an average 3.4-year gain.
  • Second Quartile – Participants in the second quartile with a change of 7.7% to 6.8% only saw a 0.5-year change in life expectancy.
  • First Quartile – No change in life expectancy was seen for those in this quartile who went from a 6.8% HbA1c down to 5.9% HbA1c.

Lowering Systolic Blood Pressure

Lowering blood pressure added just over a year to the participant’s life expectancy.

  • Fourth Quartile: The average baseline blood pressure was 160.4 mm Hg
  • Third Quartile: Participants with a 139.1 mm Hg saw 1.1 years gained in life expectancy.
  • Second Quartile: A 128.2 mm Hg was associated with a 1.5-year gain in life expectancy.
  • First Quartile: The highest increase in life expectancy for blood pressure was for those at 114.1 mm Hg with a 1.9 year gain.

Lowering LDL Cholesterol

Participants with lower LDL cholesterol, saw a change in life expectancy by a few months.

  • Fourth Quartile: The baseline was 146.2 mg/dL.
  • Third Quartile: Those who had a 107.0 mg/dL saw a half-year increase in life expectancy.
  • Second Quartile: Those who had an 84.0 mg/dL saw a 0.7 year gain in life expectancy.
  • First Quartile: Individuals who had a 59 mg/dL saw a 0.9-year gain in life expectancy.

Lowering Body Mass Index

Participants who were able to decrease their BMI saw a increased life expectancy by a few years.

  • Fourth Quartile: The baseline BMI was 41.4 (fourth quartile) with the lower three quartiles seeing a change in life expectancy.
  • Third Quartile: For individuals with a BMI of 33.0, they saw an additional 2 years of life expectancy
  • Second Quartile: Those who had a BMI of 28.6 saw an additional 2.9 years of life expectancy
  • First Quartile: Those living with Type 2 with a BMI of 24.3 see an additional 3.9 years of life expectancy

Smoking cessation also had an impact with 0.7 years added for women aged 50 to 60 years and 1.1 years for men aged 70 to 80 years of age.

Overall, we hope this news brings hope to those living with Type 2 diabetes and improves care knowing that reaching these goals can extend their lifetime.

To read more click here and here.


Join us live next Tuesday and Thursday as we continue our Level 2 – Standards of Care Intensive live updates! Read more and enroll below.


Level 2 | Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Standards | 1.5 CEs | $29

Join us live on May 10, 2022, at 11:30 am PST

This course takes a close look at insulin resistance syndrome and vascular complications. We discuss the impact of vessel disease from the heart to the toes. Included is a discussion of identifying and preventing vascular disease and a comprehensive review of the latest ADA Standards of Care for heart disease.

Objectives:

  1. The impact of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia on vessel disease
  2. State the complications and factors associated with vascular disease
  3. List management goals to reduce the risk of vascular disease
  4. Discuss strategies to promote health

Level 2 | Older Adults and Diabetes Standards | 1.5 CEs | $29

Join us live on May 12, 2022, at 11:30 am PST

This course integrates the ADA Standard of Care on elements of a comprehensive medical assessment (Standard 4) of the individual living with prediabetes, diabetes, or hyperglycemia. Through case studies and real-life situations, we discover often hidden causes of hyperglycemia and other complications, such as liver disease, sleep apnea, pancreatitis, autoimmune diseases, fractures, and more. We delve into therapy for complicated situations and discuss management strategies for other conditions associated with hyperglycemia such as Cystic Fibrosis, and Transplants. Join us for this unique and interesting approach to assessing and evaluating the hidden complications of diabetes.

Objectives:

  1. Identify common yet often underdiagnosed complications associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
  2. State strategies to identify previously undiscovered diabetes complications during assessments.
  3. Discuss links between hyperglycemia and other conditions including, transplant, cystic fibrosis and liver disease.

Level 2 | Standards of Care Intensive | 20 CEs | $199

2022 Update Airs May 10 – May 26, 2022

This bundle is specifically designed for healthcare professionals who want to learn more about the ADA Standards of Diabetes Care for their clinical practice or for those who are studying for the BC-ADM or the CDCES certification exam.

Previously recorded

Upcoming Updates


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The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

March eNews | Rediscovering the Magic of Nutrition

Happy March

Join us in celebration of National Nutrition Month!

We have a whole month to celebrate the healing properties of food and the daunting expertise and abundant knowledge of our nutrition colleagues.

Did you know that people with diabetes who meet with a RD/RDN have a 1-2% drop in A1c?

Dietitians are smart, evidence-based, caring advocates and some of my favorite people. Plus, they have the best teaching tools (who doesn’t love the measuring cups, food models and empty cereal boxes?). 

For this newsletter, we focus on the impact of nutrition on health.

We reveal the best rated meal plan and highlight how it earned the number one ranking. We also tackle the topic of B12 deficiency for those on metformin therapy. Plus, we rekindle the magic and memory of fruits and vegetables with the hopes of increasing consumption. Lastly, we detail the recently approved implantable CGM, that only needs to be changed twice a year.

We hope you enjoy our nutrition inspired Question and Rationale of the Week. And, you are invited to attend our Virtual Conference, where we dedicate an entire four hours to MNT, with our expert speaker, Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES.

Happy Nutrition Month everyone! In health,

Beverly, Bryanna, Jackson, and Amanda

Click here to read our full March 2022 newsletter.

Featured Articles

Upcoming Webinars

Featured Items


Join our Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference
30+ CEs | April 13-15, 2022

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

If you are seeking a state-of-the-art review of current diabetes care, this course is for you. Our team has been fine-tuning this course for over fifteen years, and we know what you need. This program can also be a great addition to your CDCES or BC-ADM exam study plan.

 Download Course Schedule |  Download Course Flyer

Join us LIVE for this Virtual Course and enjoy a sense of community!

Team of expert faculty includes:

  • Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES – Educator of the Year, 2020
  • Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM
  • Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES, Diabetes Program Coordinator

Two Registration Options


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Deluxe | 30+ CEs

Deluxe Option for $499: Virtual Program includes:

  • Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar.
  • LIVE Presentations by our team of experts.
  • State of the art review of current diabetes care and technology.
  • Resources for each session.
  • Access to free podcasts and video recordings within a week of each live session for one year.

Deluxe Version includes Syllabus, Standards and Swag*:

  • Diabetes Educator Course 2022 Syllabus Hard Copy – over 100 pages -This spiral-bound workbook contains the printed version of all of the instructor’s slides.
  • ADA 2022 Standards of Care Book -The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes is a key resource for healthcare professionals involved in diabetes care, education, and support.
  • DiabetesEd Services highlighters, Medication PocketCard, Tote Bag and Pen

Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Basic | 30+ CEs

Deluxe Option for $499: Virtual Program includes:

  • Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar.
  • LIVE Presentations by our team of experts.
  • State of the art review of current diabetes care and technology.
  • Resources for each session.
  • Access to free podcasts and video recordings within a week of each live session for one year.

Don’t worry if you can’t make it live. Your registration guarantees access to the recorded version in the Online University.

All hours earned count toward your CDCES Accreditation Information


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Sign up for DiabetesEd Blog Bytes

* indicates required


The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.