DiabetesEd Top 3 Blog Posts | July 2020

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It’s time for the Top 3 Blog Posts of the Month. As always, people loved our Question of the Week. The most popular question this month was on the administration of Glucagon Rescue Medications.

In addition, there was lots of interest in the newly approved rapid insulin. The post about the joy of having my children work in my company also resonated with our community. This is especially touching to me since I move Robert into college in less than 13 days.

Lastly, during this time of distress and turmoil, we thought it would be a good opportunity to feature some uplifting news. We are overjoyed to share the story of one of our course graduates, David, who recently passed his CDCES Exam. You can read his journey below and for more uplifting stories, we invite you to visit our Online Graduate Success Stories Page.

Keep Safe. Be well.

Coach Beverly

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Watch for FREE or purchase to earn CEs!

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Standards 2020
Join Live Stream August 5th at 11:30 am (PST)
1.5 CEs | $29.00 or No CEsFree

Perfect for those planning to take the CDCES or BC-ADM or for those seeking an update.

Diabetes Specialists have a critical role in advocating for CV reduction. Coach Beverly is extending a special invitation to join this webinar on the latest standards for CV reduction.

This webinar will address:

  • insulin resistance syndrome and vascular complications.
  • impact of vessel disease from the heart to the toes.
  • prevention of vascular disease
  • strategies to achieve goals of care.

Register for FREE recorded webinar (no CEs).


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!


AccreditationDiabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*

July Newsletter | Preventing Hypoglycemia to Save Lives

Preventing Hypoglycemia to Save Lives

Click here to view our July Newsletter

She woke up to the faces of concerned strangers in blue uniforms looking down at her. Trying to pull herself out of what must be a bad dream, she had trouble putting thoughts and words together. Finally, she saw her son’s face and heard him asking if she was okay. She reached up to grab his hand and make sure he was real. He asked her why she was crying.

This is not the first time she has woken up to a team of emergency responders giving her IV dextrose. As a person living with type 1 diabetes for over 26 years, she has experienced her share of close calls and a handful of times of lost consciousness due to lack of sufficient glucose to her brain.

As she relays this terrifying experience to us, how do we respond?

As Diabetes Specialists, we can help people with diabetes prevent life-threatening hypoglycemia by planning ahead and engaging in shared decision making.

In this newsletter we compare and contrast 3 lifesaving glucagon formulations. We are also excited to announce our new Glucagon PocketCard!

We discuss disparities in diabetes camps and provide a rationale for our most missed Question of the Week.

Lastly, we introduce a newly approved insulin and share the origin of our Pancreas Pillows.

We also say a fond farewell to our assistant and my son, Robert Thomassian. He has been an invaluable member of our team for the past year and now takes his leave to start college in Texas. His brother, Jackson, will take over the position and we are thrilled to welcome him on board.

We miss seeing all of you in person and welcome you to join our FREE Level 2 Webinars. Our doors are open and we would love to have you as our guest.

With Love,

Coach Beverly

Click here to view our July Newsletter


Upcoming Live Streaming Webinar
Airs July 21st & 28th, 2020, from 11:30 am to 1:00 pm (PST)

Technology Toolkit| Pumps and Sensors + Insulin Pump Calculations
Join us for the live streaming webinars on July 21st and 28th
3 CEs | $59.00

Perfect for those planning to take the CDCES / BC-ADM or for those who want to learn more about the technology used to manage diabetes.

As Diabetes Care and Education Specialists, we are expected to have expertise in diabetes technologies to improve person-centered care and optimize outcomes.

Yet, when it comes to insulin pumps, sensors, and calculations many of us feel overwhelmed and unsure about diabetes technology management. Coach Beverly created this 2-part Technology Toolkit to provide you with critical information on Insulin Pumps, Calculations, and Continuous Glucose Monitors. 

If you want cutting edge information on diabetes technology, problem-solving, and using a formula to determine appropriate insulin dosing, we highly recommend this toolkit.

Two Online Courses are included in this Technology Toolkit:

  • Tech 101 – Pumps and Sensors Update | Live Stream Webinar July 21
  • Tech 102 – Insulin Pump Calculations: From Basal to Square Bolus | Live Stream Webinar July 28

Can’t join us live? Recorded video and podcast versions are ready for On-Demand Viewing. All updates webinars are uploaded within 4 hours of the live show ending.


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AccreditationDiabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*  

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

DiabetesEd Top 3 Blog Posts | July 1, 2020

Click here to view our Top 3 Blogs Newsletter

Happy Wednesday Diabetes Community!

We are excited to announce our new feature; Top 3 blog posts of the Month.

Coach Beverly and team are committed to keeping you apprised of the latest findings in diabetes.

We promise to keep this end-of-the-month wrap-up announcement short and sweet while providing links to references so you can dig deeper.

As part of our commitment to sharing information, we are offering FREE webinar viewing of our Level 2 Standards Intensive Series. See upcoming topics and dates below.

Our top 3 blogs this month include the recall of some long-acting metformin brands, Medicare’s $35 monthly cap on insulin starting in 2021, and the rationale for this month’s most popular question of the week.

Happy early July 4th weekend. Please stay safe and take good care.

Coach Beverly

Click here to view our Top 3 Blogs Newsletter


Check out our new bundle!

Level 3 | Boot Camp + Expert Team Bundle
Join us live starting September 16th!

When you join our DiabetesEd Certification Boot Camp, it’s like having your own online coaching staff.

?In each webinar, either Coach Beverly, Dr. Isaacs, or Ms. Armstrong, highlight the critical content of each topic area, so you can focus your study time most efficiently. They also launch multiple poll questions to help participants focus on key concepts and assess their knowledge while learning the best test-taking strategies. 

Mastery of this content is critical to ensure certification exam success and to improve clinical outcomes.

Click here to download Level 3 + Expert Bundle flyer

Enroll Today!

Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!


AccreditationDiabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*  

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

June Newsletter | Strategies to Provide Inclusive Care

Diabetes and Inclusivity – Strategies for Change

Click here to view our June Newsletter

Our community has faced many challenges in 2020. As a result of the pandemic, some health professionals have lost their positions or had jobs furloughed. We have shifted from in-person visits to telehealth. For those working on the front line, there is a real fear of being infected by COVID-19.

In our neighborhoods, we are witnessing many of our community members demanding a repair of social injustices. There is a recognition that worse health outcomes with COVID-19 and diabetes are often the result of longstanding social inequities in marginalized communities.

As diabetes advocates, we owe ourselves the time to reflect on how these inequities came to be and how we can contribute to their repair.

Certainly, as a community dedicated to health, we can stand up and acknowledge, address, and advocate to improve health equity for each person.

In this newsletter, we explore strategies to provide more inclusive diabetes care. From reflecting on the language we choose to how we set up and deliver our health care services. Let’s step back and take a new view from a different lens and see how we can be more welcoming to all people, but especially to those from marginalized communities.

We also celebrate the 2021 Medicare Cap on the monthly cost of insulin and share a warning on some brands of metformin. Lastly, we dive deep into two of our Questions of the Week and provide rationales.

Please consider joining Coach Beverly for her ADA Standard Intensive Live Stream Webinar Series (below). We invite you to join us for free as our guest. We want to make sure that everyone has access to this critical information.

Coach Beverly

Click here to view our June Newsletter


Upcoming Live Streaming Webinar
Airs June 23, 2020 from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm (PST)

Our Level 2 Standards of Care Intensive Series is designed to engage students in deciphering and exploring the ADA Standards of Care from top to bottom. This straight forward program will provide you with information you can use in your clinical setting and also provides critical content for the diabetes educator exam.

Mastery of this content is critical to ensure certification exam success and to improve clinical outcomes.

Register for FREE live stream webinar (no CEs)


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!


AccreditationDiabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*  

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

May Newsletter | Insulin Savings, Telehealth Updates, and Salivary Glucose Testing

Click here to read our entire May Newsletter

As a Diabetes Nurse Specialist in a local clinic, I am providing telehealth once a week. During these visits, I am checking in with people about their food and medications.

Do you have enough food and insulin to last? Most of them answer, “yes, for now”. 

Many of them may run out of insulin and supplies in the near future, some as a result of the costs that make essential medications in-affordable. If this is the case, what can we offer them?

We are excited to thank our guest contributor and Diabetes Educator of the Year, Dr. Diana Isaacs, who has provided us with helpful information and a multitude of resources for people in need of low-cost insulin.

In light of the COVID-19 emergency, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), has expanded opportunities to provide remote care to people with diabetes. We have highlighted some recent updates and provided links to helpful resources for your billing team.

Lastly, we are looking towards the future with salivary glucose testing and insights into a past Question of the Week.

I am grateful to be a part of this amazing community of diabetes specialists. Thank you for your care, concern and advocacy.

Be well! Coach Beverly

Click here to read our entire May Newsletter


Virtual Course Insulin Therapy, Pumps, & CGM + CV Risk Reduction Strategies
Earn 4.0 CEs | $69

Join Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES, and ADCES 2020 Diabetes Educator of the year as she reviews these important topics. As Diabetes Specialists, we are tasked with taking a leadership role in technology and cardiovascular risk reduction. Dr. Isaacs will address these topics with clinical insight and expert knowledge during these two virtual courses.

Session 1 | CV Risk Management with Pharmacology and Intensive Insulin Therapy | Recorded & Ready for Viewing!

Session 2 | Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Pump Therapy | Recorded & Ready for Viewing!

Objectives:

  1. Describe critical teaching content before starting insulin pump therapy.
  2. Describe appropriate candidates for insulin pump therapy.
  3. Discuss strategies to determine and fine-tune insulin pump basal rates.
  4. Discuss how to determine and fine-tune bolus rates including coverage for carbs and hyperglycemia.
  5. State important safety measures to prevent hyperglycemic crises.
  6. List inpatient considerations for insulin pump therapy and CGMs.
  7. Discuss features of available professional and personal CGMs and insulin pumps.
  8. Describe CV risk factors associated with diabetes and future event prediction.
  9. List different pharmacologic approaches to mitigate CV events.

$69 | Earn 4 CEs

Purchase Now!

These sessions are also included in our Virtual Conference.

Enroll in entire DiabetesEd Vitual Conference.

Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!


AccreditationDiabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*  

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

April Newsletter | COVID-19 & Best Diabetes Care

Click here to read our entire April Newsletter

At a local hospital, a person in their mid-40s, with type 2 diabetes was admitted for treatment of COVID-19 and Diabetes Ketoacidosis (DKA). An insulin drip was started and their SGLT-2 Inhibitor was stopped. Why are people with type 2 and COVID-19 going into DKA and how is this impacting outcomes?

A person with type 1 diabetes calls into a rural health clinic and says they are running a temperature, having difficulty breathing and can’t get their blood sugars below 300. The diabetes specialist instructs them to go to the hospital. What supplies should they take in case they are admitted to the hospital?

How do we help prepare people with diabetes for the possibility of hospitalization and what are best practices to care for people with diabetes and COVID-19 in the hospital setting?

What instruction do we provide for people with diabetes if they get sick and are wondering if they need to go to the hospital?

In this newsletter, our goal is to answer these questions based on the opinions of experts in the field and the best information to date.

In addition, we are excited to share information on drone delivery of insulin, mask making and the opportunity to celebrate the AADE (ADCES) Educator of the Year, Dr. Diana Isaacs.

Lastly, please let CMS (Medicare) know that RNs and Pharmacists need to be considered as providers of DSME telehealth services. Now, more than ever, we need all hands on deck.

Thank you everyone. Take extra good care of yourselves.

Beverly

Click here to read our entire April Newsletter


Diabetes 2020 – Virtual Conference!
Now with COVID-19 Update
7.5 CEs | $89 | April 23-30th

The COVID Pandemic is taking a toll on people with diabetes. What is the critical information Diabetes Care and Education Specialists need as we navigate this pandemic? How can take a leadership role in providing sound recommendations while helping to manage the full range of diabetes issues, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular risk reduction?

Coach Beverly has created this four-session virtual course so that participants can delve deep into the topics that are most pressing for diabetes care now and in the future. We will focus on improving population health and then drill down to individual intervention through case studies. We will discuss implementing cardiovascular risk screening and treatment in the clinical setting and more!

Download the Diabetes 2020 flyer here.

Course Schedule: Each session airs from 8:30 am—10:00 a.m. PST

Session 1 – Getting to the Heart of Care – 1.5 CEs – Recorded & Ready for Viewing!

  • Our role as Diabetes Care and Education Specialists
  • Diabetes and the COVID Pandemic
  • ADA and 2020 Medication Management Algorithm –

Session 2 – Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Strategies – 1.5 CEs – Airs April 24th

  • ADA and AACE Guidelines for CV Risk Reduction
  • Implement Risk Reduction Strategies
  • Addressing Hypertension, Lipids and Weight – A Case Study Approach

Session 3 – Lower Extremity Assessment and Intervention – 1.5 CEs – Airs April 28th

  • Peripheral Arterial Disease vs Vascular Disease
  • Lower extremity assessment techniques
  • Prevention strategies and education

Session 4 – Making meaningful Connections and a Vision for the Future – 1.5 CEs – Airs April 30th

  • Adverse Child Experiences – ACE and Impact of Diabetes and other Health Outcomes
  • Improving health- From individuals to populations

Download the Diabetes 2020 flyer here.

Enroll Now!

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Positioning our Practice for the Future | February Newsletter

February Newsletter Now Available!

Our February Newsletter celebrates the future of diabetes care and education. As we settle into the year with a new title, amazing advances in health tech, and a person-centered approach, we are excited about what’s ahead! Our newsletter and Blog Bites are focused on filling the knowledge gaps while honoring these changes, as we move into a new era of diabetes care and education.


Sign up for our Monthly Newsletter


Featured Blog Byte

Every weekday our Diabetes Detective Team scans the news to discover and report on the most relevant info that Diabetes Ed Specialists need for their daily practice.


New Triple Combo Pill for Type 2 Diabetes

The FDA made history last month by approving the first-ever triple combination pill for type 2 diabetes. This medication can help simplify the medication regimen for people living with type 2 diabetes.

As the director of the diabetes research unit at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Ralph A. DeFronzo, MD, said, “Type 2 diabetes is a complex disease that often requires the use of multiple antidiabetic medications to improve glycemic control. Having three different diabetes medications in a single tablet is an important advance in diabetes treatment.”

Known as Trijardy XR, this medication combines the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin, the DPP-IV inhibitor linagliptin, and metformin extended-release. Both empagliflozin and linagliptin lower blood glucose and empagliflozin has the added benefit of reducing the risk of cardiovascular death and chronic heart failure for those living with cardiovascular disease or chronic heart failure.

Additionally, a trial that was presented at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Scientific Sessions by Healio found that linagliptin will not increase the risk for a cardiovascular event, nor will it contribute to the progression of renal disease among people with type 2 diabetes. This trial, known as the CARMELINA trial, was conducted over six years, across a group of 6,000 people. The trial demonstrated that no “between-group differences for the incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke and CV death during a median of 6 years.”

  • Trijardy XR will be available in four dosages:
  • 5 mg empagliflozin/2.5 mg linagliptin/1,000 mg metformin ER
  • 10 mg empagliflozin/5 mg linagliptin/1,000 mg metformin ER
  • 12.5 mg empagliflozin/2.5 mg linagliptin/1,000 mg metformin ER
  • 25 mg empagliflozin/5 mg linagliptin/1,000 mg metformin ER.

There is no information on pricing as of yet. Read more about Trijardy here.

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Inclusive Diabetes Care for LGBTQ Community

Expert Interview with Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE President of Sweet People Club

1. What inspired you to write the ground-breaking article for on “Providing Culturally Sensitive Care for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community” in Diabetes Spectrum, gosh – already 10 years ago now?

I heard a researcher at a national conference go on and on about needing to screen the daughters of women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) for diabetes since there is a strong link between PCOS and type 2. She never discussed the population of women that have the highest rates of PCOS – lesbians (38% of lesbians have PCOS vs. 14% of heterosexual women1). So I went up to the mic and asked her if she was aware of Agrawal’s work showing lesbians have the highest rate of PCOS. I was flabbergasted when she said yes. I responded she might want to include that most vulnerable population in her talk as we need to screen all women at risk.

It got me thinking about how could a well-known professor at a national diabetes conference willingly withhold data about an under-served population? So, I began to comb through the existing research that impacts the LGBTQ community with regards to diabetes care and prevention. And I was astonished what I found. So, I wrote the article and was so glad the ADA published it. But why wasn’t this part of the conversation back then? Even now? And I still ask, why won’t ADA reply to my inquiries to include this special population within their Standards of Care?

2. What’s the first step our readers could do to provide inclusive care to the sexual and gender minority population of people with prediabetes and diabetes who seek care?

Actually take steps to include this special population. I think there are several opportunities to do this, starting with making sure their environment gives clues that it is a safe place for the LGBTQ community to seek care. Remember, this community is used to outright hostility from within the healthcare system and are often reluctant to self-disclose out of fear for getting substandard care.  I once worked with a man with type 1 diabetes who was gay tell me that his endocrinologist told him he deserved every low he got, and that when he’d go to the emergency department, they refused for his husband to be by his side And that happened in the gay mecca of San Francisco! Imagine other “less tolerant” places.

If they see you don’t have a clue because you have old forms with old terms, they most likely won’t come out. And if they don’t come out, then you don’t have all the data to make an individualized plan. So, you can check your assessment forms to see if you use inclusive terms. Do you actually ask for LGBTQ status by asking for sexual orientation, gender identification and relationship status (not marital status)? And collect the aggregate data! Just because it’s not measured doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. Do you have clues in your waiting room that it’s safe and friendly for this group (like post a little rainbow flag)? Do you include LGBTQ risk factors for health outcomes in your materials? Do you tell people you are here to help everyone, no matter their situation or who they’re with? I realize change is slow, but collectively as individuals, and nationally, we can make it a better place for this underserved population.

3. “Inclusive Care” seems to be the new buzz phrase, but I bet most diabetes care and education specialist think they are being inclusive. I mean, how could you not be?

Because if you don’t even know a certain segment of those you care for have unique risk factors, and arguably worse – you have no clue who that vulnerable population is in your practice – you aren’t doing all you can to provide quality care to all you serve. It’s estimated that the number of LGBTQ individuals with diabetes equals that of the amount of people with type 1, so it’s not a small number we’re talking about. As an example, let’s apply this to Social Determinants of Health. We talk about the research showing how your zip code has more to do with your health than your DNA, particularly as it relates to food insecurity. But did you know LGBTQ individuals and families have the highest rates of food insecurity? Why isn’t that research included in diabetes mainstream publications and conferences?

According to research presented by the Williams Institute2, more than 1 in 4 LGBTQ adults (27%), approximately 2.2 million people, experienced a time in the last year when they did not have enough money to feed themselves or their families, compared to 17% of non-LGBTQ adults.

And when you add racial/ethnic sub-populations within the LGBTQ community, the stats are staggering:

  • Among LGBTQ people, 42% of African-Americans, 33% of Hispanics, 32% of American Indians and Alaskan Natives, and 21% of Whites reported not having enough money for food in the past year.

4. I was thrilled to see the handout that you wrote about inclusive care for the AADE. That’s a start for sure. How do you think this came about?

Thank you! I am so excited to see our national organization pay attention to the LGBTQ population and help get the word out about what we can do. I think because they are interested in us being the best diabetes care and education specialist that we can and including everyone is part of that. I had also just spoken at the AADE conference in Houston. We had a panel of professionals and researchers that represented the LGBTQ community. (I had spoken previously at AADE, but that was just by myself and this last time was so special.) I’m truly impressed with how much research that has transpired in these 10 years.

5. Any closing thoughts?

I’d say that a willingness to learn is so important. As is recognizing one’s personal biases. We certainly don’t agree with the lifestyles of all we serve, but it is not our role to judge or let those biases interfere with helping someone find a path to thriving with diabetes. And just know, it takes time to get up to speed. I’d encourage readers to check out the AADE handout and watch this funny video clip that a colleague sent me. Honestly, it is hard to keep up with the terms, even for someone like me who helped to get this topic on the diabetes radar. This video made me crack up and appreciate the nuance of all the terms. I bet your audience would like it too. You can check out the “What “The Sex Talk” Looks Like Now, by Alternatino. Thanks so much, Beverly, for your willingness to discuss the topic. I truly hope it helps your readers improve their care delivery.


Ms. Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDE  trail-blazed several innovations in the field of diabetes in the years that followed being awarded the national Diabetes Educator of the Year by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (2004).

Her latest efforts involve trying to reach people with prediabetes and type 2 who are currently not being reached with our face-to-face programs. How? She created the Sweet People Club  an all online program which uses a flipped classroom concept so people can follow the Diabetes Prevention Program and also manage type 2 through a series of professionally-made videos (ahem, nearly 150 of them!) that they can watch at a time that is convenient for them, then ask questions through the portal, as well as meet virtually face-to-face real time with a Registered Dietitian twice a month.

If you’d like access to experience what the program is like, she is sharing her work and invites your feedback. Visit https://www.sweetpeopleclub.com/pro/ or email her for questions at Theresa.Garnero@sweetpeopleclub.com 

  1. Agrawal et al: Prev. of polycystic ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome in lesbian women compared w heterosexual women. Fert Steril 82:1352-57, 2004.
  2. FOOD INSECURITY AND SNAP PARTICIPATION IN THE LGBT COMMUNITY. (n.d.).
  3. Sweet People Club

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