A Diabetes Nurse Takes a Fresh Look at the Plate Method

For the past year, as the only diabetes nurse educator at a local FQHC clinic, I have had to fine-tune my nutrition coaching skills. We are hoping to hire a dietitian soon, but in the meantime, I am trying to find my nutrition groove as I work with Spanish-speaking clients, kids to elders, and everyone in between.

For many years, I shied away from using the plate method and mostly relied on dietary recalls and figuring out changes needed to improve the health quotient of their current meal plan.

However, as people walk into my clinic room, I am surprised by how many are drawn to the oversized healthy plate place-mats sitting on my display table. They ask, “Can I eat these foods?” This sparks a lively and constructive conversation on new approaches to eating.

Based on this enthusiastic response, after I complete the dietary recall, I jump into our food conversation using the plate method. Whether am I coaching kids to elders on healthy eating, this approach seems to get the best response. If needed, I will dive into more detail around carb serving sizes and matching carbs to insulin.

Using the plate method allows me to keep it person-centered and help them include their favorite foods to maintain the pleasure of eating.

How I use the Plate Method:

This teaching tool is ideal because it has appealing pictures of the different foods that make it easy to provide a quick review of the food groups and their impact on blood sugars and overall health.

In addition, these plates represent a variety of cultures and eating styles, and come in several languages. Here is the one in Spanish I use all the time.

Order ADA Placemat in Spanish

5 Main Pointers

Take a vegetable tour: I start on the left side of this place mat, which has pictures of a variety of healthy high fiber vegetables, which I emphasize are low in calories and packed with nutrients. Then I ask which vegetables are they currently eating and provide encouragement to continue and expand their veggie choices, if possible. “Enjoy an abundance of these super foods, that fill you up, feed your good bacteria, decrease inflammation, help manage blood sugars and support a healthy weight.”


Next stop – CARBS and Beans – There is a lot of misinformation around the carbohydrate group and many people tend to lump them in the “bad food” category. We discuss the carbs they are consuming and discuss some they might be missing out on, like fruits or tortillas, thinking they were off-limits. I encourage 3 servings of fruit daily, (the size of a closed fist) spread throughout the day.
Beans, the magical fruit! I make an intentional effort to sing the praises of beans. They are the inexpensive, fiber-packed nutrition superstars and they are so versatile.
A big focus with carbs is portion sizes. The actual amount of carbs someone is consuming is really easy to underestimate. For this part, I DO pull out my rubber food models, which are as popular as ever.


Canned and Frozen veggies are good for you. Many people may not have access to fresh vegetables or refrigeration. Canned vegetables and soups are often a cheaper, more realistic option. They can choose low sodium if they have hypertension or they can rinse off salty, often less expensive canned vegetables. If they have access to a freezer, frozen veggies offer as many nutrients (and sometimes more) than fresh vegetables, especially if they have been on the shelf for a while.
I encourage starting meals with soups, salads, or water if they are trying to lose weight.


Protein and meats – Our discussion focuses on serving sizes and healthy ways to prepare low fat or skinless meats. If their LDL cholesterol is above target, we will include a discussion on meat alternatives and review cheese consumption.


Sugary Beverages, Sweet Treats, and Snacks – Coffee with a little cream and sugar is fine, but those coffee drinks topped with whip cream can pack lots of carbs and unwanted calories. Replacing sports drinks and sodas with water or unsweetened tea can make a huge difference in glucose levels and body weight.

Mindless muching. I find many people munching on snacks and sweet treats (especially in the evenings) out of boredom or in response to stress. Helping people ask themselves, “Am I really hungry?” before that first bite can make a big difference. Also keeping track of the emotion associated with “mindless snacking” can help people discover other strategies to deal with uncomfortable feelings.

The plate method is simple, engaging of fun. We can customize the plate based on their food favorites and help individuals and families improve their health and feel better!

Resources To Check Out

Get Started on the ADA Diabetes Food Hub – Sign up to save recipes, create a personalized grocery list, and more.

Please visit the ADA’s Diabetes Food Hub recipe page.
They have an abundance of recipes based on budget, preferred foods, time of day, etc… Plus, they also provide the nutrition facts, and it’s FREE!
ADA website: https://www.diabetesfoodhub.org/ 

Check out Awesome photos and ideas modeling the “Diabetes Plate Method”

USDA Plate Method Website has lots of great info

USDA Diabetes Meal Planning in Spanish

Order ADA Placemat in Spanish


National Nurse’s Day Sale
We are celebrating with 15% off our entire store.

To recognize the contribution of nurses in our community, we are celebrating with 15% off our entire store.

Diabetes Ed Services is thrilled to celebrate these health care heroes.

Use the code “NURSE15” during checkout

Sale ends Sunday, May 16th at Midnight PST


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Accreditation: Diabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

Ramadan & Fasting Considerations for People Living with Diabetes

Ramadan Mubarak…. Happy Ramadan.

This evening, Ramadan begins. It is the most important spiritual time for the 1.8 billion Muslims around the world.

‘Have a generous Ramadan”

In Islam, Ramadan is the month in which the first verses of the Quran, were revealed to Prophet Muhammad. In observance, many Muslims fast by abstaining from food, drink, smoking, and sex, from pre-sunrise to sunset. This fasting achieves greater “taqwa” or “consciousness to God.”

As Diabetes Care and Education specialists, we have the chance to provide tools for those who fast while keeping diabetes in mind.

The Association for Diabetes Care and Education Specialists (ADCES) put together some helpful handouts to better support people who are fasting and living with diabetes.

Below is the list of resources shared by ADCES

To read more about Ramadan, click here.

To take our Question of the Week that considers Type 1 and fasting during Ramadan.


On Sale | Now just $24.95
ADA 2021 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes Book

The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes is a key resource for healthcare professionals involved in diabetes care, education, and support.

One of the most important pieces of literature to read prior to becoming a Diabetes Care and Education Specialist and for clinical practice, the Standards of Care book is a study must!

The book includes:

  • ADA’s standards for diagnosing and treating diabetes
  • Nutrition recommendations and principles
  • Position statements on managing diabetes and its complications in various settings

Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Accreditation: Diabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

Plant-Based Eating Resources | Free Resource Friday

It’s National Nutrition Month!

We have compiled a list of plant-based therapy articles and resources to celebrate the importance of nutrition.


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Course
Earn 30+ CEs | April 15-17, 2021


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Program

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

DiabetesEd Virtual Conference Flyer 2021

Diabetes Ed Virtual 3-Day Schedule 2021

Prepare for CDCES or BC-ADM certification or earn hours for renewal.

If you are interested in taking the CDCES or BC-ADM exam or are seeking a state of the art review of current diabetes care, this course is for you. Our team has been fine-tuning this course for over fifteen years, and we know what you need.

Can’t join live? No worries, your registration guarantees access to the recorded content through Dec 31, 2021!

Team of expert faculty includes:

  • Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES – Educator of the Year, 2020
  • Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM
  • Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES, Diabetes Program Coordinator

In addition to informative lectures, we also use group activities and case studies to highlight the essential knowledge, skills, and strategies needed to succeed in diabetes education today! 

Your registrations include access to all the Online Sessions plus Bonus Courses through December 31st, 2021.

Bonus Courses worth 14 + CEs FREE – When you register for our Virtual Course, you have immediate access to these Bonus DiabetesEd University Online Courses – for FREE!


ADCES Desk Reference + 5th Ed Review Guide Book Bundle

The 5th Edition ADCES Desk Reference & 5th Edition Review Guide Bundle –our most popular AADE Book Bundle for exam preparation!

What is included in the ADCES Book Bundle?

The Art & Science of Diabetes Self-Management Education Desk Reference – 5th Edition

Major Features:

  • practical information educators can use with patients to avoid complications and comorbidities
  • risks and benefits of CGM and the educator’s role in working with patients who use CGM
  • updated info on incorporating the ADA, AADE, and AND joint position statement and algorithm of care into a DSME program

ADECES Review Guide for the Diabetes Care and Education Specialist Exam – 5th Edition

Includes an answer key with rationales for all questions included in the guide! 

Major Features:

  • 480 + multiple-choice questions
  • Strategies for preparing for and taking the exam

3 self-assessment tests that cover three main content sections on the CDCES Exam:

  • Assessment of Diabetes and Prediabetes 
  • Interventions for Diabetes and Prediabetes
  • Disease Management 

Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Accreditation: Diabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.* 

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

Happy Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day! | Join the Celebration

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are the food and nutrition experts who can translate the science of nutrition into practical solutions for healthy living.

Some of my favorite people are RD/RDNs. I’ve been blessed to teach with many inspiring, kind, knowledgeable and dynamic dietitians over a span of more than 20 years. They are trailblazers and advocates for improving the health of our communities, in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. They have the best teaching tools (who doesn’t love the rubber grapes, food samples and empty cereal boxes) and a breadth of knowledge that they excitedly share with their diabetes community and colleagues alike.

To celebrate Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day, we are interviewing an emerging leader in the field, Ashley LaBrier.

Interview with Speaker, Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDES

Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDES, is an innovator in the field of diabetes, nutrition, and technology. Ashley is a consultant, and the Diabetes Education Program Coordinator at the Salinas Valley Medical Clinic’s Diabetes & Endocrine Center. 

Ms. LaBrier is passionate about providing person-centered education to empower those who live with diabetes. Having been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes herself nearly 20 years ago, she combines her professional knowledge with personal experience and understanding. 

Meet Ashley at our Virtual Diabetes Specialist Course on April 17, 2021.

1.  Question – What do you love about being a RD and Diabetes Specialist?

Ms. Labrier – There are a few things I REALLY love about being a dietitian and working with those living with diabetes:

At our clinic, education visits are purposely scheduled to allow adequate time to really understand the needs of each individual and make personalized suggestions. I LOVE that our work allows us to get to know the people we work with so intimately. This knowledge ultimately translates into providing meaningful support based on individual needs.

I also love teaching group education classes. There are few things more energizing than a room full of people who have come together to learn more about their diabetes. These classes always lead to great questions, dialogue, and connection. Hearing people leave an education class feeling empowered to conquer their diabetes and live a more healthful life is so satisfying for me personally and professionally. 

Lastly, translating nutrition and diabetes so it “makes sense” – I find it satisfying to see that “light bulb moment” after explaining a new concept. 

Question –  How do you anticipate nutrition recommendations changing for people with diabetes lives over the next few years?

Ms. LaBrier – I’m not sure how nutritional guidelines will change in the next few years, but I’d like to see more research exploring the long-term health impact of the popular diets, particularly the ketogenic diet and other higher fat and protein diets.  I also hope that dietary guidelines begin to factor in the social and environmental consequences of what we eat, not just nutrition alone.  What we eat impacts our health and the planet – sustainability is key. 

Question – Over the past year, what has been most challenging about providing diabetes care during the pandemic?

Ms. LaBrier – The pandemic has brought so much uncertainty to our lives. In working with our participants at the clinic, many have lost their jobs and are experiencing financial hardship. Some are busy caring for children or elderly or have lost a loved one. Others are more isolated from their social circles and support systems. Many have found it difficult to manage stress because certain activities that bring joy have been suspended. All of these factors, and many more, have complicated the picture for our community. Although every person has individual concerns, it seems like many individuals and families are stretched thin. They may have competing priorities and concerns that make managing a chronic condition more difficult than ever before. 

Question – What actions can Diabetes Specialists take to counsel people with diabetes who are facing food insecurity?

Ms. LaBriera key in working with individuals who face food insecurity is approaching the situation with compassion and a desire to understand.

Ask questions and make an honest effort to understand the struggles that they are facing around obtaining food. Not only does this help to build trust between the specialist and person with diabetes, but providing effective assistance is more realistic when you know what struggles they are facing. Being aware of the resources in your local community is especially important. Social workers can assist in applying for financial and food assistance programs. Plus local and affordable farmers markets and food banks can help sustain people through rough times. f

Question: Would you share your hobby (ies) and how you maintain work life balance?

Ms. LaBrier – My fiancé and I make an effort to get outside for fresh air cocktails regularly. We live in a beautiful area and enjoy paddle boarding, runs on the beach, hiking, camping trips, or walks in the neighborhood. Even on the busy days we maintain our work life balance by prioritizing time together doing these activities. 


Four ways you can thank your Registered Dietitian Nutritionist:

  1. Send a note letting them know the ways you appreciate them
  2. Give them a virtual hug to thank them for their good work
  3. Let providers know how much they contribute to improving health
  4. Bring them flowers or a plant

Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Course
Earn 30+ CEs | April 15-17, 2021


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Program

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

DiabetesEd Virtual Conference Flyer 2021

Diabetes Ed Virtual 3-Day Schedule 2021

Prepare for CDCES or BC-ADM certification or earn hours for renewal.

If you are interested in taking the CDCES or BC-ADM exam or are seeking a state of the art review of current diabetes care, this course is for you. Our team has been fine-tuning this course for over fifteen years, and we know what you need.

Can’t join live? No worries, your registration guarantees access to the recorded content through Dec 31, 2021!

Team of expert faculty includes:

  • Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES – Educator of the Year, 2020
  • Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM
  • Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES, Diabetes Program Coordinator

In addition to informative lectures, we also use group activities and case studies to highlight the essential knowledge, skills, and strategies needed to succeed in diabetes education today! 

Your registrations include access to all the Online Sessions plus Bonus Courses through December 31st, 2021.

Bonus Courses worth 14 + CEs FREE – When you register for our Virtual Course, you have immediate access to these Bonus DiabetesEd University Online Courses – for FREE!


ADCES Desk Reference + 5th Ed Review Guide Book Bundle

The 5th Edition ADCES Desk Reference & 5th Edition Review Guide Bundle –our most popular AADE Book Bundle for exam preparation!

What is included in the ADCES Book Bundle?

The Art & Science of Diabetes Self-Management Education Desk Reference – 5th Edition

Major Features:

  • practical information educators can use with patients to avoid complications and comorbidities
  • risks and benefits of CGM and the educator’s role in working with patients who use CGM
  • updated info on incorporating the ADA, AADE, and AND joint position statement and algorithm of care into a DSME program

ADECES Review Guide for the Diabetes Care and Education Specialist Exam – 5th Edition

Includes an answer key with rationales for all questions included in the guide! 

Major Features:

  • 480 + multiple-choice questions
  • Strategies for preparing for and taking the exam

3 self-assessment tests that cover three main content sections on the CDCES Exam:

  • Assessment of Diabetes and Prediabetes 
  • Interventions for Diabetes and Prediabetes
  • Disease Management 

Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Accreditation: Diabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.* 

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

Meet Ashley, LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are the food and nutrition experts who can translate the science of nutrition into practical solutions for healthy living.

To celebrate Registered Dietitians, we are interviewing an emerging leader in the field and our Virtual Conference Speaker, Ashley LaBrier.

Interview with Speaker, Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDES

Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDES, is an innovator in the field of diabetes, nutrition, and technology. Ashley is a consultant, and the Diabetes Education Program Coordinator at the Salinas Valley Medical Clinic’s Diabetes & Endocrine Center. 

Ms. Ashely Labrier, MS, RD, CDCES

Ms. LaBrier is passionate about providing person-centered education to empower those who live with diabetes. Having been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes herself nearly 20 years ago, she combines her professional knowledge with personal experience and understanding. 

Meet Ashley in person at our Virtual Diabetes Specialist Course on April 17, 2021

1.  Question – What do you love about being a RD and Diabetes Specialist?

Ms. Labrier – There are a few things I REALLY love about being a dietitian and working with those living with diabetes:

At our clinic, education visits are purposely scheduled to allow adequate time to really understand the needs of each individual and make personalized suggestions. I LOVE that our work allows us to get to know the people we work with so intimately. This knowledge ultimately translates into providing meaningful support based on individual needs.

I also love teaching group education classes. There are few things more energizing than a room full of people who have come together to learn more about their diabetes. These classes always lead to great questions, dialogue, and connection. Hearing people leave an education class feeling empowered to conquer their diabetes and live a more healthful life is so satisfying for me personally and professionally. 

Lastly, translating nutrition and diabetes so it “makes sense” – I find it satisfying to see that “light bulb moment” after explaining a new concept. 

Question –  How do you anticipate nutrition recommendations changing for people with diabetes lives over the next few years?

Ms. LaBrier – I’m not sure how nutritional guidelines will change in the next few years, but I’d like to see more research exploring the long-term health impact of the popular diets, particularly the ketogenic diet and other higher fat and protein diets.  I also hope that dietary guidelines begin to factor in the social and environmental consequences of what we eat, not just nutrition alone.  What we eat impacts our health and the planet – sustainability is key. 

Question – Over the past year, what has been most challenging about providing diabetes care during the pandemic?

Ms. LaBrier – The pandemic has brought so much uncertainty to our lives. In working with our participants at the clinic, many have lost their jobs and are experiencing financial hardship. Some are busy caring for children or elderly or have lost a loved one. Others are more isolated from their social circles and support systems. Many have found it difficult to manage stress because certain activities that bring joy have been suspended. All of these factors, and many more, have complicated the picture for our community. Although every person has individual concerns, it seems like many individuals and families are stretched thin. They may have competing priorities and concerns that make managing a chronic condition more difficult than ever before. 

Question – What actions can Diabetes Specialists take to counsel people with diabetes who are facing food insecurity?

Ms. LaBrier – a key in working with individuals who face food insecurity is approaching the situation with compassion and a desire to understand.

Ask questions and make an honest effort to understand the struggles that they are facing around obtaining food. Not only does this help to build trust between the specialist and person with diabetes, but providing effective assistance is more realistic when you know what struggles they are facing. Being aware of the resources in your local community is especially important. Social workers can assist in applying for financial and food assistance programs. Plus local and affordable farmers markets and food banks can help sustain people through rough times. f

Question: Would you share your hobby (ies) and how you maintain work life balance?

Ms. LaBrier – My fiancé and I make an effort to get outside for fresh air cocktails regularly. We live in a beautiful area and enjoy paddle boarding, runs on the beach, hiking, camping trips, or walks in the neighborhood. Even on the busy days we maintain our work life balance by prioritizing time together doing these activities. 


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Course
Earn 30+ CEs | April 15-17, 2021
Use code “RD15” for 15% off till March 19th at 11:59 pm PST

Enroll Now!


Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Program

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

DiabetesEd Virtual Conference Flyer 2021

Diabetes Ed Virtual 3-Day Schedule 2021

Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference

Reserve your spot now for our

Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference | April 15-17, 2021

Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

Entire Program Fee: $399
Dates: April 15-17, 2021
Live Webinar Schedule: All webinars start and end times are in Pacific Standard Time

DiabetesEd Virtual Conference Flyer 2021
Diabetes Ed Virtual 3-Day Schedule 2021

Team of Experts & Schedule

Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, BC-ADM, CDCES

Author, Nurse, Educator, Clinician and Innovator, Beverly has specialized in diabetes management for over twenty years. As president and founder of Diabetes Educational Services, Beverly is dedicated to optimizing diabetes care and improving the lives of those with diabetes.


Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES

We are thrilled to welcome our newest speaker, Diana Isaacs, who will be joining our Virtual and Live Courses!

Dr. Isaacs was named 2020 AADE Diabetes Educator of the Year for her educational platform promoting the use of CGM for people with diabetes and other innovations.  Dr. Isaacs was awarded the Ohio Pharmacists Association Under 40 Award in 2019. Dr. Isaacs has served in leadership roles for several pharmacies and diabetes organizations. She has numerous diabetes publications and research projects with a focus on medications, CGM and diabetes technology.

As the CGM Program Coordinator and clinical pharmacist specialist in the Cleveland Clinic Diabetes Center, Dr. Isaacs brings a wealth of clinical knowledge combined with extensive research experience to this program.

Diabetes Meds and Insulin Toolkit – with Dr. Diana Isaacs | 4.0 CEs
April 15  10:30 am – 12:30 BREAK and 1:15 – 3:15 PST 

*Topics include:

  • Diabetes Medications, What Diabetes Specialists Need to Know
    • Update on the latest medication information
    • How to put ADA and AACE Algorithms into practice
    • Critical teaching points with a focus on safety
  • Insulin – The Ultimate Hormone Replacement Therapy
    • Latest update on available insulins
    • How to use ADA algorithm for insulin management
    • Teaching pointers for safe and effective insulin use

Technology Toolkit with CV Management Update – Dr. Diana Isaacs | 4.0 CEs – 
April 16 with 8:30—12:30 am  

  • Intensive Insulin Therapy— From Carbs to Correction to reach glucose targets
    • Formulas on determining insulin coverage for carbs and hyperglycemia
    • Using glucose results to evaluate effectiveness
  • Integrating Technology, Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Pumps into care.
    • Update on the latest technology, from meters to CGM with an emphasis on problem solving.
    • Delivering insulin, from pens to pumps
    • Understanding glucose reports and determining best action
  • CV Risk Management with a Pharmacology Focus
    • Apply the ADA guidelines to improve CV outcomes
    • Describe the preferred medication using a case study approach

Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES

Ashley is an educator, dietitian, and the Diabetes Education Program Coordinator at the Salinas Valley Medical Clinic’s Diabetes & Endocrine Center. Her work with people living with diabetes focuses on the value of healthy nutrition and movement to improve well-being.

Ashley is passionate about providing person-centered education to empower those who live with diabetes. Having been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes herself nearly 20 years ago, she combines her professional knowledge with personal experience and understanding. 

April 17 with Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES
8:30 am — 12:30 pm PST

  • Medical Nutrition Therapy Overview  
  • Meal Planning – How to Eat by the Numbers
  • Keeping Well Through Activity and Nutrition

*Dates and times subject to change. Course start and end time are for Pacific Standard Timezone.


DiabetesEd Virtual Conference Flyer 2021
Diabetes Ed Virtual 3-Day Schedule 2021

Bonus Courses – Course registration includes FREE enrollment into our Level 2 Standard of Care Course Series including:

  • Level 2 – Assessing and Promoting Well-Being: From Population Health to a Person-Centered Approach 1.5 CEs
  • Level 2 – Hospital and Hyperglycemia 1.5 CEs
  • Level 2 – Hyperglycemic Crisis, DKA and HHS Standards 1.0 CEs
  • Level 2 – Meds Management Update for Type 2 – 1.5 CEs
  • Level 2 – Pattern Management Gone Crazy 2.65 CEs
  • Level 2 – Setting up a Successful Diabetes Program 1.5 CEs
  • Level 2 – Women and Diabetes 1.5 CEs
  • Level 2 – From Tots to Teens – Diabetes Standards 1.5 CEs
  • Level 2 – From Tots to Teens – Diabetes Standards 1.5 CEs
  • Level 2 – Older Adults and Diabetes 1.5 CEs
  • Test Taking Toolkit
  • Mindfulness and Compassion in the Diabetes Encounter – 1.0 CE

Team of expert faculty includes:

  • Diana Isaacs, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, BCACP, CDCES – Educator of the Year, 2020
  • Coach Beverly Thomassian, RN, MPH, CDCES, BC-ADM
  • Ashley LaBrier, MS, RD, CDCES, Diabetes Program Coordinator

In addition to informative lectures, we also use group activities and case studies to highlight the essential knowledge, skills, and strategies needed to succeed in diabetes education today! 

Prepare for CDCES or BC-ADM certification or earn hours for renewal.

Your registrations include access to all the Online Sessions plus Bonus Courses through December 31st, 2021.

This virtual program includes:

3 day live webinar courses from April 15th-17th (20 CEs) + enrollment in our Bonus Bundle (14.0+ CEs) from now through December 2021.

  • Live Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar
  • Presentations by our team of experts
  • Handouts and Resources for each session
  • Post-test questions
  • A sense of community
  • If you can’t attend the live webinars, a recorded version will be posted later the same day for viewing.

View full Conference Schedule and Faculty.


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Accreditation: Diabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

Cozy Winter Recipes by Dawn DeSoto

Dawn Desoto RD, CDCES, celebrates the winter season with a collection of recipes that nourish and provide comfort.

Below are the following recipes:

  • Golden Milk
  • Sugar-Free Mexican Drinking Chocolate
  • Smoky Roasted Mushrooms 
  • Quinoa Tabbouleh Salad

Golden Milk Recipe

Yield 2 servings 

  • 2 cups milk (coconut, almond, soy milk can be substituted)
  • 1 Tb honey or stevia syrup to taste
  • 1 Tb coconut oil
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • Pinch of ground black pepper
  • Pinch of grated fresh ginger or ¼ tsp ground ginger

Directions

Simply pour all ingredients into a small saucepan, whisk to combine ingredients.  Heat until hot to the touch but not boiling – about 4 minutes. Enjoy warm.


Sugar-Free Mexican Drinking Chocolate Recipe

  • 1 13. 5 oz can of full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 cup water
  • ¼ cup cacao powder
  • 4 Tb granulated monk fruit sweetener
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 dash cayenne
  • 1 dash Celtic sea salt

Directions

Combine is a small saucepan and whisk until the consistency is smooth and silky. Pour into mugs. Give thanks. Enjoy.


Smoky Roasted Mushrooms Recipe

  • 2 lbs of whole mixed mushrooms
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tablespoon of butter
  • parsley as garnish

Directions

Toss whole mushrooms, olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl. Spread on a baking dish and roast at 425 degrees F, stirring a few times, until tender and browned for 30 to 35 minutes. Cook thinly sliced garlic cloves and smoked paprika in butter until soft, toss with the mushrooms. Sprinkle with chopped parsley and salt. Enjoy.


Quinoa Tabbouleh Salad Recipe

  • 1 cup uncooked quinoa
  • 1 ½ cups minced fresh flat leaf parsley
  • 1 cup minced fresh mint
  • 3 fresh tomatoes
  • ¼ cup finely chopped scallions or onions
  • ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice, or more to taste
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ¾ tsp salt, or more to taste

Instructions

  1. Rinse uncooked quinoa in cold water using a fine mesh strainer until the water runs clear. Drain.
  2. Spread quinoa in the bottom of a stain-less steel skillet in an even layer. Turn heat to medium and let the quinoa heat up, stirring occasionally, until the moisture is gone.
  3. Continue to cook the quinoa over medium heat, stirring frequently, for roughly 10 minutes until it begins to turn toasty and fragrant. The quinoa is ready when the seeds start to pop and turn golden brown. Remove from heat.
  4. Pour quinoa into saucepan along with 1 ½ cups of water. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cover the pan.
  5. Cook quinoa for 10 – 12 minutes until tender, but not mushy. Stir and let cool to room temperature.
  6. Place minced fresh parsley and min in a medium salad bowl.
  7. Whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil and salt.
  8. Seed the tomatoes by quartering them, remove the seeds.
  9. Dice the tomatoes into small pieces.
  10. Gently stir together tomatoes, herbs, scallions, quinoa, and olive oil lemon juice dressing.
  11. Serve at room temperature.

We hope you enjoy these delicious recipes!

Written by Dawn DeSoto RD, CDCES, our resident Nutrition Content Writer


Whether you are new to diabetes or a seasoned expert, you’ll benefit from this virtual conference with the latest research plus critical content that you can immediately apply to your clinical practice.

Entire Program Fee: $399
Program Flyer: Download
Dates: April 15-17
Live Webinar Schedule: All webinars start and end times are in Pacific Standard Time
Program Schedule & Expert Bios

What is the Diabetes Educator Course? 

If you are interested in taking the CDCES or BC-ADM exam or are seeking a state of the art review of current diabetes care, this course is for you. Our team of expert faculty has been fine-tuning this course for over fifteen years, and we know what you need. In addition to informative lectures, we also use group activities and case studies to highlight the essential knowledge, skills, and strategies needed to succeed in diabetes education today! 

In this course, the same speakers will cover the same content as outlined in the Live Seminar.  For more details see our Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Conference Schedule and Faculty.

Prepare for CDCES or BC-ADM certification or earn hours for renewal.

Come join our Virtual DiabetesEd Specialist Program.

Your registrations include access to all the Online Sessions plus Bonus Courses through December 31st, 2021.

This virtual program includes:

3 day live webinar courses from April 15th-17th (20 CEs) + enrollment in our Bonus Bundle (14.0+ CEs) from now through December 2021.

  • Live Q & A Session with the instructor after each webinar
  • Presentations by our team of experts
  • Handouts and Resources for each session
  • Post-test questions
  • A sense of community
  • If you can’t attend the live webinars, a recorded version will be posted later the same day for viewing.

View full Conference Schedule and Faculty.


Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

Accreditation: Diabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

Food Insecurity, COVID, & Mental Wellness

Food insecurity is on the rise and is affecting mental health and well-being. See list of Hunger Relief Organizations

Not having our basic needs met, like limited access to food, has a dramatic impact on our mental health.

The pandemic has significantly impacted our mental health due to the trauma, social isolation, and economic instability which has led to an increase in food insecurity.

Since the start of the pandemic, the number of families experiencing food insecurity has increased dramatically, from 8.1% to 10.0% from March to June 2020.

As Diabetes Care & Education Specialists, we realize how important access to healthy, nutritious foods are for diabetes self-care and mental health. Addressing food insecurity and providing resources to fill in gaps, can be a lifeline and improve mental health for people living with diabetes.

A recent study led by Jason M. Nagata, MD, MSc, who works in the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, at UCSF dove into the correlation between food insecurity and mental health.

“Food insecurity is associated with diets high in low-cost, energy-dense packaged foods, but low in fruits and vegetables, which may lead to chronic medical conditions such as diabetes and hypertension, both of which are known to be associated with a higher risk for severe COVID-19 illness” the study states.

The study highlights how different populations are more at risk of experiencing food insecurity with lower-income, single individuals or large families, people of color, those recently unemployed, and people younger in age being the most affected.

Food access disparities that disproportionately affect people of color and low-income individuals and families have been an ongoing public health concern, even before the pandemic.

The study by Dr. Nagata and team cites the term “food apartheid” which activist Dara Cooper describes as the “blatantly discriminatory corporate-controlled food system that results in [communities of color] suffering from some of the highest rates of heart disease and diabetes of all time.”

Food shortages due to border closures, essential workers falling ill, school closures that provided meals to over 35 million children pre-pandemic, and the overall economic crisis, have exasperated food insecurity.

“Food insecurity may lead to poor mental health through chronic stress, stigmatization, and perceived powerlessness. Conversely, people experiencing poor mental health symptoms may be less able to work, generate income, or manage financial resources, which could exacerbate food insecurity.”

The study used cross-sectional data from the U.S. Census Household Pulse Survey that was collected and analyzed in 2020 across 63,674 participants. Those who experienced food insufficiency in the past 7 days were more likely to experience mental health outcomes such as anxiety, worry, anhedonia, and depression.

A decrease in mental health symptoms was noted for those who received free groceries within the past 7 days.

The study concludes that assistance programs that provide free meals, financial assistance, paid sick leave, mental health resources, and stimulus funding can help decrease the cycle of food insecurity and improve mental health outcomes.

To read more, click here to view the study.

Click here to read more about food apartheid.

Written by Bryanna Sabourin, our Director of Operations & Customer Happiness

More Resources for Health Care Providers

The National Diabetes Education Program maintains an online resource (www.cdc.gov/diabetes/ndep/training-tech-assistance/index.html) to help health care professionals design and implement more effective health care delivery systems for those with diabetes.

The National CLAS Standards website (https://thinkculturalhealth.hhs.gov) offers a number of resources and materials that can be used to improve the quality of care delivery to non–English-speaking patients

The ADA provides a list of mental health providers who have received additional education in diabetes at the ADA Mental Health Provider Directory (professional.diabetes.org/mhp_listing).


Join Coach Beverly for her annual- Recorded and Ready for Viewing
Level 2 – Standards of Care Update!

This course is an essential review for anyone in the field of diabetes. This course summarizes the 2021 updates to the American Diabetes Association’s Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes and provides critical teaching points and content for health care professionals involved in diabetes care and education.

Earn 2.0 CEs and get ready to lead the charge to implement best care practices for the New Year. 

Topics Include:

  • A review of changes and updates to the 2021 ADA Standards of Medical Care
  • Identification of key elements of the position statement
  • Discussion of how diabetes educators can apply this information in their clinical setting

Sign up for Diabetes Blog Bytes – we post one daily Blog Byte from Monday to Friday. And of course, Tuesday is our Question of the Week. It’s Informative and FREE!  Sign up below!

AccreditationDiabetes Education Services is an approved provider by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider 12640, and Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), Provider DI002. Since these programs are approved by the CDR it satisfies the CE requirements for the CDCES regardless of your profession.*  

The use of DES products does not guarantee the successful passage of the CDCES exam. CBDCE does not endorse any preparatory or review materials for the CDCES exam, except for those published by CBDCE.

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